Heating and cooling buildings accounts for 40% of total energy consumption in the U.S. This tutorial on refrigeration cycles steps through calculations needed to predict temperatures, pressures, and flowrates in a refrigeration loop.

Note: the video recording cut out about 1 minute before the end. The answers are:

1. From the evaporator, find the mass flow: 833 lbm/hr
2. From the compressor, find the work required: Ws = -15,000 BTU/hr
3. From the condenser, find the cooling rate: -75,000 BTU/hr
4. Check the overall balance: 0 = Qcond – Ws + Qevap = 60,000 – (-15,000) + (-75,000) = 0

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41 thoughts on “Basic Calculations of Refrigeration Cycle

  1. Sunil Chopdekar says:

    Hi I am sunil chopdekar Civil structural Engineer , done HVAC from SIT mumbai after taken traiing in August 2016, I could understand your explanation nicely on PH graph. Its really helpfull and practical.

  2. HamDan says:

    Hello my dear sir, please could you help me in this problem
    it is not clear
    3. Refrigerant-134a enters the compressor of a refrigerator as superheated vapor at 0.1 MPa and
    -10°C at a rate of 0.12 kg/s, and it leaves at 1.4 MPa and 50°C. The refrigerant is cooled in the condenser to 24°C and 0.65 MPa, and it is throttled to 0.15 MPa. Disregarding any heat transfer and pressure drops in the connecting lines between the components, show the cycle on a T-s diagram with respect to saturation lines, and determine (a) the rate of heat removal from the refrigerated , space and the power input to the compressor, (b) the isentropic efficiency of the compressor, and (c) the COP of the refrigerator.

    I could not find the enthalpy at state 2 , because there is no values in the given temperature and pressure in the superheated table

    please help me

  3. uberkwii says:

    Hi, in your worked example you begin with the starting temperature of 85F. What is the reasoning for this temperature? is it a random value? typical value? a value which directly relates to most refrigeration systems? or environmental consideration?

  4. Panos kb says:

    The Qcold is referred to the heat of our home, that is going to be used in the evaporator in order to cool down our home? Am I right? Thinking the evaporator as heat exchanger and trying to identify the cold and heat streams. Then the heat stream is the stream that comes from the home and the cold stream is this that comes from the expansion valve (which is the refrigerant). Am I right? Thank you in advance!

  5. Uriel Rivera says:

    Hi. How do you get Q in kW if you don't have any information given in units of BTU/hr. I was thinking in Q=mass flow*(H2-H1) for example but I can't do that because she don't have Q in BTU/hr for example.

  6. Sudarshan Inampudi says:

    Please submit solution for CO2 refrigeration cycle calculation – give COPr value, if

    Evaporation temperature is – 20 C and condensation is at +40 C

    Isentropis efficiency of compressor is 0,85.

    Please calculate mass flow of CO2 and compressor shaft power for cooling duty 100 kW.

    USE CO2 moller chart
    can any one solve this problem

  7. 13 -Ahmed Mohamed Hassan says:

    Refrigerant-134a enters the compressor of a refrigerator as superheated vapor at

    0.14 MPa and -10°C at a rate of 0.12 kg/s, and it leaves at 0.7 MPa and 50°C. The

    refrigerant is cooled in the condenser to 24°C and 0.65 MPa, and it is throttled to

    0.15 MPa. show the cycle on a T-s diagram with respect to

    saturation lines, and determine (a) the rate of heat removal from the refrigerated

    space and the power input to the compressor, (b) the isentropic efficiency of the

    compressor, and (c) the COP of the refrigerator when i solved the example i said that Q rejected=m(hv@0.15mpa-hafter throttling) and i didn't say (h entering compressor-h after throttling) as we know that it exits from evaporator saturated and enters compressor superheated due to heat transfer in connecting line and pressure drop

  8. Ravi Kumar says:

    Hi Sir I have an query,

    I have calculated heat exchanger designed capacity by assuming inlet temperatures & found the outlet temperatures of refrigerant (R134a).
    When i plot those calculated temperatures in the P-h Diagram am getting the different capacity of heat exchanger. Could you suggest how to bring the system equilibrium.

    Latent heat ratio considerd as 0.75 at Evaporator throughout the calculations & iterations.

    I tried with changing inlet temperatures from lower limit of refrigerant to higher limit in PH diagram also changed the super heating as well. still am unable to achieve the equilibrium state.

    Kindly suggest what else could be the other mode of mistakes.

  9. OurNPadventures says:

    If I am using R134a as refrigerant and have Q=3kW of heat to remove from the cabin of a car, what is the temperature at state 1 and the pressures at 2 and 3 that I should use (i see you already had them to start with)? My external heat/ambient is 40deg celcius. with this I should be able to follow your example and achieve all the elements of my refrigeration system.

  10. solanki pratik says:

    Hello sir my name is pratikkumar I'm fresher mechanical engineer. I want to learn everything about block ice plant. I want to make my own 1 ton 150kg block ice machine please guide me.

  11. Ryan Jacquet says:

    Any chance I could get an explanation why the temperature of R22 doesn't decrease after moving through the evaporator? I was under the impression that it takes the heat from the surrounding air making the air colder to be blown into the car. I may be reading the drawing incorrectly, thank you.

  12. Varun AV says:

    Sir,

    The video was really useful and got a lot of new learnings to design my system. Can you help me where I can find the resource to design the Fin and tube evaporator for my experiment. I am searching in and out on the internet but not able to find the theoretical calculation or design consideration for Fin and Tube Evaporator. Kindly help me with this.

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